So you want to adopt a bunny?  

 

How to adopt a rabbit

The first step is to complete our rabbit adoption application.

To be sure adopting a rabbit is right for you, we strongly recommend that you read a rabbit care book, such as the “The Bunny Burrow Rabbit Care Guide” which the www.TheBunnyBurrow.org has allowed us to share with you!

Which one (or two) do I choose?

You’ll find a terrific selection of rabbits (see below) waiting to meet someone just like you. If you find one you love, please put his or her name in your adoption form.

Please note that many of our rabbits have a rabbit friend. We do not break up these bonded pairs; they must be adopted together.

If you aren’t sure which bunny is right for you, our adoption specialists love playing matchmaker! They’d be delighted to hear from you at bunniesmatter@gmail.com.

What happens after I apply?

After we look over your application, we will talk with you on the phone or in person (Petsmart event every Saturday in Las Vegas  11 AM – 3 PM – 9775 W. Charleston Blvd.) about the rabbit(s) you’d like to adopt, and tell you more about any special needs they might have. Then, we will do a home check. A home check is done by a bunnies matter member AFTER you have set up your home for one or two of our bunnies; it helps ensure that you and your new rabbit(s) will be comfortable and happy living in your home together.

The fun part: How do I get my new rabbit(s)?

We encourage adopters to come to Petsmart to meet their potential new rabbit(s) on the weekend after viewing online here or on Facebook.  Please message us via email or Facebook so we can make sure we can have the bunny or bunnies you want available as they are all fostered.  Once everyone agrees it’s a good fit and the home check is completed, you can return the following weekend to pick up your bunnies.

All rabbits are spayed or neutered and vetted. There is an adoption fee of $25 for a single rabbit or $40 for a pair to help offset these costs.

 

 

 

Las Vegas Dumpsite Bunnies Available For Adoption

(Pending a Spay or Neuter in some cases)

 

 

Smokie & Annie waiting for their forever home

 

Smokey is not sure he likes that camera pointed at him.

Annie and Smokey have been waiting a long time for their perfect forever home. 🙁

Smokey is a little shy and a little fat but very sweet.  Annie is Smokey’s best friend but she is a little timid and just needs that special bunny person to love her. Both are about 2 years old and are both fixed. Both were part of our original TNR rescue but were brought inside due to injuries (both fully recovered now).

 

If you are interested in adopting, please message us on Facebook or email at  bunniesmatter@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here are some additional things you need to know.

First, bunnies are inside pets ONLY.  Yes, they need to go outside and get some sun and play in the grass, but they are INDOOR pets ONLY.

When baby bunnies are sold for $20 – $30, that is really about $230 because they are usually required to be fixed BY LAW plus they will live longer if fixed (over 10 years)! If you don’t fix them, they will pee all over the place and if they get out, they can destroy your house by chewing all the wires in your house.

Bunnies require the correct equipment (exercise pens $35+ each, large cage – $35+, carrier=-$25+, litter boxes-$6+, paper litter-$14+ for 25#s, water and food dishes-$1 at $1 store, toys-$???, etc.), you are looking easily at a $200+ investment overall just for one or two little bunnies including their adoption fee.

At Bunnies Matter, we prefer to adopt out our bunnies as bonded pairs because when you are at work or school all day, at least they still have each other for company. Occasionally we will have singles or triplets available but we believe bonded pairs are the best way to go.

An ideal house would have no other pets but rabbits can get along with many dogs or cats, you just have to be careful and a bunny should never be left alone with a dog or a cat.

A bunny is not a starter pet for a small child. No one under 6 should probably ever have a bunny and if a child is under 12, there needs to be close adult supervision to make sure the bunny is being properly taken care of.